Updated Top 5 Lamps for Seasonal Affective Disorder — — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Are you suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD? Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons. Many people experience worse symptoms in the winter months. One of the proven ways to help with SAD is a specific type of lamp or light therapy box that emits a […] […]

Updated Top 5 Lamps for Seasonal Affective Disorder — — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Disability

  • What is a disability?
  • What if I’m getting medication or treatment for my mental health problem?
  • What if I had a disability in the past?
  • Checklist: Is my mental health problem a disability?

What is a disability?

You have to show that your mental health problem is a disability to get the protection of the Equality Act.

‘Disability’ has a special legal meaning under the Equality Act, which is broader than the usual way you might understand the word. Even if you don’t think you have a disability, the Equality Act may protect you from discrimination if your mental health problem fits its definition of disability.

The Equality Act says you have a disability if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial, adverse, and long-term effect on your ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

The focus is on the effect of your mental health problem, rather than the diagnosis. So you need to show that your mental health problem:

  • has more than a small effect on your everyday life
  • makes things more difficult for you, and
  • has lasted at least 12 months, is likely to last 12 months, or (if your mental health problem has improved) that it is likely to recur.

Examples of ‘substantial adverse effect’

Simon has obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). He has to check and recheck whether lights are switched off and doors are locked. This can make him late for work or other appointments. His obsessive thoughts often distract him from activities that he is doing and disrupt his daily routines. His mental health problem therefore has a substantial adverse effect on the way he does things.

Examples of ‘long term’

  • Jenny has had depression for 10 months and the doctor says it will be likely to last at least another 4 to 5 months.
  • Selina has bipolar affective disorder. She had her first and second episode in January 2013, then a third episode in January 2014. Even though there was a gap between her second and third episode, her mental health problem is considered to have continued over the whole period (in this case, a period of 13 months).

What if I’m getting medication or treatment for my mental health problem?

If you are getting some treatment or taking medication for your condition, you ignore the effect of your treatment when deciding whether your condition is having a substantial, adverse effect on your daily activities. This means the law is looking at how your condition affects you without your treatment or medication.

Example

Mohammed has long-term anxiety and is being treated by counselling. Anxiety would normally make him find simple tasks difficult. Because he has counselling, he is able to get up and go to work.

The Equality Act says you have to ignore his treatment in deciding whether his mental health problem has a substantial adverse effect on his day-to-day activities and so he has a disability.

What if I had a disability in the past?

You are still protected from discrimination if you had a disability in the past. That means that if your past mental health problem had a substantial, long-term and adverse effect, you will get the protection of the Equality Act.

Examples

Four years ago, Mary had depression that lasted 2 years and had a substantial effect on her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. She has not experienced depression since then.

If Mary is treated worse by her employer because of her past mental health problem, she will be protected by the Equality Act.

Checklist: Is my mental health problem a disability?

You can ask yourself these questions:

  1. Do I have a mental or physical health impairment?
  2. Is it long-term (meaning lasting more than 12 months or likely to do so)?
  3. Does it have a more than minor adverse effect on my day-to-day living, if I discount my treatment or medication?

If you answered “yes” to all three questions, then your mental health problem could get the protection of the Equality Act.

If you want to get the protection of the Equality Act, you may find it helpful to get some evidence from your GP, or another medical professional. You can ask them to write a letter saying whether they think you have a disability under the Equality Act. It would be particularly useful if they can give their opinion on the answer to each of these three questions.

Example

Esra doesn’t consider herself disabled because she doesn’t receive disability benefits and she is physically healthy.

Esra has been living with an anxiety disorder for the past 3 years. Because of this, it takes her a longer time to do things like get up in the morning, dress herself for the day and do the shopping. She takes medication to control the symptoms.

Esra would be protected by the Equality Act because she has:

  • a mental impairment – an anxiety disorder
  • it is long term – she has had it for the past 3 years
  • it has a substantial effect on her daily life – her mental health has a major effect on her daily life when you ignore the effect of her medication  
  • it has an adverse effect – her mental health problem makes things more difficult for her.

How to Overcome Social Comparison and Life Dissatisfaction: 7 Tips — Guest Blogger Aisles of Life — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

We live in the time of social media and the internet, where, for their own reasons, people feel the need to broadcast their personal and professional lives for everyone to see. From their achievements, relationships, children, cars, vacations, and houses, to simple things like the food they eat. All these public displays can make others […] […]

How to Overcome Social Comparison and Life Dissatisfaction: 7 Tips — Guest Blogger Aisles of Life — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Coming to Know Todd — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Originally posted on Walking the Rails: While dying is what we are trained to fear, it turned out that bearing witness to the passage from living to dead was not as difficult for me as I had expected. Somewhere in the process, I became detached from the anticipated dread, and engaged in a pleasantly unexpected…

Coming to Know Todd — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Cerebral Adrenomyeloneuropathy — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Originally posted on Walking the Rails: This one is not such a cheerful installment. I am aware that I promised that the content of this website would be optimistic and upbeat. Nonetheless, as we all know, the potential for cerebral involvement is part of the bargain. I do not plan to dwell on it, but…

Cerebral Adrenomyeloneuropathy — Survivors Blog Here Mental Health Collaborative

Anxiety and panic attacks

Explains anxiety and panic attacks, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family.

What are anxiety disorders?

Anxiety can be experienced in lots of different ways. If your experiences meet certain criteria your doctor might diagnose you with a specific anxiety disorder.

Some commonly diagnosed anxiety disorders are:

  • Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) – this means having regular or uncontrollable worries about many different things in your everyday life. Because there are lots of possible symptoms of anxiety this can be quite a broad diagnosis, meaning that the problems you experience with GAD might be quite different from another person’s experiences.
  • Social anxiety disorder – this diagnosis means you experience extreme fear or anxiety triggered by social situations (such as parties, workplaces, or everyday situations where you have to talk to another person). It is also known as social phobia. See our page on types of phobia for more information.
  • Panic disorder – this means having regular or frequent panic attacks without a clear cause or trigger. Experiencing panic disorder can mean that you feel constantly afraid of having another panic attack, to the point that this fear itself can trigger your panic attacks. See our page on panic attacks for more information.
  • Phobias – a phobia is an extreme fear or anxiety triggered by a particular situation (such as going outside) or a particular object (such as spiders). See our pages on phobias for more information.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – this is a diagnosis you may be given if you develop anxiety problems after going through something you found traumatic. PTSD can involve experiencing flashbacks or nightmares which can feel like you’re re-living all the fear and anxiety you experienced at the time of the traumatic events. See our pages on PTSD and complex PTSD for more information.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) – you may be given this diagnosis if your anxiety problems involve having repetitive thoughts, behaviours or urges. See our pages on OCD for more information.
  • Health anxiety – this means you experience obsessions and compulsions relating to illness, including researching symptoms or checking to see if you have them. It is related to OCD. You can find out more about health anxiety on the Anxiety UK website.
  • Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) – this means you experience obsessions and compulsions relating to your physical appearance. See our pages on BDD for more information.
  • Perinatal anxiety or perinatal OCD – some people develop anxiety problems during pregnancy or in the first year after giving birth. See our pages on perinatal anxiety and perinatal OCD for more information.

You might not have, or want, a diagnosis of a particular anxiety disorder – but it might still be useful to learn more about these different diagnoses to help you think about your own experiences of anxiety, and consider options for support.

Anxiety and other mental health problems

It’s very common to experience anxiety alongside other mental health problems, such as depression or suicidal feelings. If you have symptoms of both anxiety and depression but don’t fit one more clearly than the other, you might be given a diagnosis of ‘mixed anxiety and depressive disorder’.


Living with GAD & panic attacks after losing my Dad

“I really believe that talking is one of the best therapies you can have.”Read Zoe’s story

Battling the Binge — BeautyBeyondBones

Binge eating – it’s a cycle of utter hell that so many wrestle with for episodes, seasons, years. But it’s time to BREAK THE CYCLE! From Top Eating Disorder Recovery blog, how she combatted binge eating after overcoming severe anorexia. An inspiring and helpful article full of practical and impactful advice! #recovery #anorexia #bingeeating #eatingdisorder #health #mentalhealth #food #diet #bodyimage #wellness

Battling the Binge — BeautyBeyondBones